Blog

Blog 
by Ruth Mary Allan 07 Dec, 2017

Every year we seem to have a habit of setting ourselves New Year’s Resolutions, yet two or three months down the line no action has been taken, we’ve not committed to what we said we would and that gym membership has never been used.   Have you ever done that?!   So what can we do differently to increase our chances of success in achieving what we set out to?   Here’s three simple steps, which we know from high performance studies work, that you can use to help you on your journey to realising your New Year’s resolutions.

Step 1 - Calendarise

How many times have you written something down on a “to do” list, such as a New Year’s resolution and it never gets done?   Did you commit to a date when it would happen by?   To increase your chances of success put your commitments in your calendar.   You are much more likely of success if you do this.   In fact, why not pull out an annual calendar on one page and decide what commitments you are going to do when, so you can visualise it? Get your commitments, in particular when you will start something by or finish something by, in your calendar and set an electronic reminder for yourself!

Step 2 - Communicate

Have you ever made a New Year’s resolution to yourself, but never communicated it to anyone, so you tell yourself “it doesn’t really matter I haven’t done it as no one knows?!”   What would happen if you publicised your New Year’s Resolutions on social media or to your family and friends and asked your network to hold you to account - would that shift your perspective?   By tying your commitment into something bigger than you, such as to your family, friends, workplace, society, you are far more likely to succeed.   So communicate your commitments to others and state what you will do if you don’t achieve it!

Step 3 - Consistency

Underpinning all aspects of high performance living, is consistency.   If your intention as part of your New Year’s resolutions is to set a new habit (such as going to the gym), you need to consistently commit to that new habit.   Ideally for at least 60days for it to really take effect.   To increase your chances of success avoid making a commitment list that’s as long as your arm that you are unlikely to be successful in, e.g. going to the gym five times a week if you’ve never been to it once.   Commit to going once or twice and then increase your frequency.   That’s not to say don’t dream big - absolutely dream big, but take small steps to get there and importantly celebrate the small wins towards those big dreams.

If you enjoyed this post or know of someone that might benefit from it, please like and share!

If you want to register for a discovery session to help you on your journey to not only setting, but achieving those New Year's resolutions, click on the link below!

https://www.ruthmaryallan.com/store/yLMPSunS

by Ruth Allan 22 Nov, 2017
I'm sure we can all cite good and bad examples of leadership in our lives, whether from an experience we've had with those that have led us, or from lessons we've learned ourselves on how to be a better leader.  What factors really stood out for you that differentiated the good leaders from the bad? 

I believe there are ten key attributes that constitute effective leadership, whether in the workplace, at home, or with our wider network.  These can be conveniently remembered by the acronym LEADERSHIP.

L is for Learning from Others

Effective leaders first and foremost are always learning from others. Constantly.  This includes developing the areas that they know they need to work on so that they can stay on their "A" game and better serve others.  Top athletes - leaders in their primary field of interest, are constantly learning new ways to refine their technique, to train more efficiently, to apply the latest technology to improve their performance. 

If as a leader you don't invest time in your own personal development, it's hard to effectively lead and maintain your credibility in your own primary field of interest.

E is for Encouraging Others

Linked to learning, an effective leader is constantly encouraging others with a positive mindset, creating the right environment for individuals and teams to grow.

Have you ever received negative feedback - how did that make you feel?  Rarely does negative feedback help individuals unless they are able to look beyond the negativity and find the lesson within the feedback received.  Effective leaders, however, feed forward and look for ways to help their team be more - whether that's more effective, more efficient, more energised, more motivated.  Effective leaders positively encourage others to become more.

If as a leader you are spending your time berating others, putting people down, you are doing the equivalent of poisoning a flower in your own garden that wants to grow.   Flowers need appropriate watering, nutrients and the right soil to flourish.  Don't be the leader that no one wants to work with.  Set a positive frame of mind, create the positive environment and always seek to encourage others.

A is for Acting with Integrity

Have you ever been in an organisation where they say one thing and do another?  Or they publish the company values yet don't act them out on a consistent basis?  To be an effective leader you need to act with integrity.  Always.  This is not only doing the right thing when no one else is looking, but living by your core values and the values of the company you represent.  With integrity comes trust, so be true to yourself.  Listen to that inner voice of reason and be authentic in how you show up as a leader.

D is being Decisive

Indecisive leaders who constantly seek other people's advice before making any decision very quickly lose credibility.  It's absolutely ok as a leader to ask for advice, but once received, make a decision.  Making no decision is always the wrong decision.  This is because it's a difficult and slow process to learn from indecision.  In contrast, wrong decisions very quickly become apparent, allowing you learn from them and course correct.  Few battles are won from indecision, yet many have been lost.

E is for Engaging with the World Around them

To create a following you need to engage with those that support you and work for you.  You need to engage with your team.  This is not just about organising a social gathering or meeting, but actively listening to what your supporters or team are interested in - what fires them up, what motivates them.  Get to know them at a more personal level.  Get to know the world in which they and you are operating and how it is changing.  If you don't show an interest in those that you are leading, how can you expect them to show an interest in you?  Engage.  Be present.  Be openminded.

R is for Role Model

Linked to acting with integrity, to be an effective leader you have to role model the way.  It is no good saying we "do" this, yet not "doing" that yourself.  Be the role model that everyone looks up to - the person everyone wants to be.

S is for Sharing their Wisdom

Effective leaders don't guard their knowledge - they share it.  Wise people typically share an optimism that life's problems can be solved and exude calm when facing difficult decisions.  Share your wisdom with others so that they too may learn and grow wise.

H is for Honesty

To gain the trust and loyalty of your team, you need to not only act with integrity, but be honest with them and with yourself, particularly in times of difficulty.  Don't be afraid to be vulnerable in the areas you need support on.  If you are prepared to learn from others and act with integrity, being honest should be simply a matter of course.  Leaders that aren't honest very quickly lose the trust of their team and those they are serving.

I is for Inspire

Effective leaders inspire others to think differently, helping others push their own envelop of what they believe is possible by the example that they set.  This in turn helps the organisation that they work for.  Be inspirational.

P is for Passion

Finally to be an effective leader you have to be passionate at what you do.  It's very difficult to lead effectively if you are not passionate about your primary field of interest that you are a leader in.  Linked to inspiring and encouraging others, ignite that fire inside you so that you can light the fire in others.  Be passionate about what you do and who you are leading.

Please leave any comments you have on this article below!  If you enjoyed it please share.

If you would like further support on Effective Leadership, please contact us .
by Ruth Allan 17 Nov, 2017
As we approach that festive time of year, perhaps the first festive present that we receive is a winter virus, a common cold or simply just feeling run down and longing for the festive break.   Have you ever succumbed to the dreaded flu just as you are going into a holiday period, only to loose all your time you wanted to spend relaxing and recharging and spend it in bed?

This used to happen to me frequently.  It was awful as it not only affected me, but also my husband.  There has been many an occasion where he has lost precious holiday time to looking after a sick wife!  Indeed this time last year, run down by the unexpected mental and emotional stress that work and life threw at me, I found myself constantly off sick with a cold or sinusitis, recovering for a short period only to be off sick again.

I didn't want to spend my time constantly nursing a blocked nose, run down and exhausted mentally, physically and emotionally.   I knew that life didn't have to be like that.  It was time to take back control of my wellbeing.

Since taking back control I have not once had a cold or sinusitis.  I've stopped needing to take the drugs that cluttered our medicine cabinet over the festive period.  In addition to that since March 2017 I've lost 26lbs (12kgs) in weight and become the lightest and healthiest I've been in over 10years!

How did I do it?  I became the BOSS™ of my wellbeing:

  • I BELIEVED in myself that I could do it
  • I OVERCAME the hurdles and temptations that decreased my energy levels and performance
  • I SUCCEEDED in achieving my goals of being the fittest I've ever been
  • I soared beyond my own expectations and have begun to inspire and impact other people's lives positively.

So how did I do it?  Here's three simple steps you can take to become the BOSS of your wellbeing and get on that journey to recovery:

Step 1:  Have belief in yourself!

We know from psychology that one of the most important things in achieving success in anything you do is BELIEVING that you can do it.  Visualising not only achieving it, but also the struggles that you will have to go through to get there.  Stop telling yourself that you can't and start believing that you can.  

Write down what you want to believe - what you want to believe you can do and how you want to show up in the world.  Look at that list every day and keep telling yourself you can!  It's time to start believing in you.

Step 2: Overcome your excuses

Do you ever find that you keep making up excuses for yourself as to why you can't do things? e.g.:

  • "I'm not like her/him/them," "I'm not fit enough," "I tried it once before and it didn't work," "I'm not capable," "I'm not good enough," "I don't deserve it," or
  • "I'll start the diet tomorrow," "I'll start my fitness campaign in the New Year"... The list goes on.

Stop making excuses to yourself.  Doesn't your body deserve better than that?  Doesn't your mind deserve to have clarity of thought, your emotions to be under your control?  Stop reaching for that quick fix, such as that chocolate brownie (my nemesis!), that large latte, that alcoholic drink (again other previous favourites of mine) - or whatever it is that you know won't serve your wellbeing over the long term.

Write down all the excuses you keep making to yourself and reframe them to what you will do - you must do along with the benefit it will bring, e.g:

  • "I must switch from having those large full fat caffeinated lattes to small skinny decaf lattes/water as it will allow me to generate a more consistent energy level throughout the day to tackle life's challenges."

Step 3: Success in small steps

Frequently one of the greatest failings in improving our wellbeing consistently over the long term is that we try to take giant leaps at the start of the journey and fail.  Have you ever done that?  The classic "bitting off more than we can chew" and then you give up at the first hurdle because it's too hard?

If you want to improve your wellbeing consistently over the long term you need to play the long term game.  In the same way as we don't see sprinters running marathons, don't try and sprint off the starting blocks when you want to run the whole marathon.  Take small steps.  Tackle one excuse at a time.  Celebrate the small wins - celebrate your successes.  Track your progress and keep focused on the long term goal - never lose sight of it.  Don't give up if you trip up.  Celebrate the fact that you can get up again.  Get up as Mo Farah does and you too can win your race. Stay focused on that dream.

If you enjoyed this article please share.

High performance coaching™ helps you achieve heightened and sustained levels of performance and potential in your life, so that you can feel more vibrant, energised, purposeful and fulfilled.  If you feel you would benefit from high performance coaching™ to help you achieve these steps on a more consistent basis, contact us to register for a free strategy session!
by Ruth Allan 25 Oct, 2017
Are you in an organisation, where creativity is a way of life, where invention and innovation is embraced and the people within it are empowered to be creative and duly rewarded and recognised for their efforts?  Or are you in an organisation where creativity is not encouraged and any suggested improvement gets put in the "too difficult" box or "can't be done, as that's the way we always do it" box?

What if it were simple to generate the appropriate creative space to enable your teams to innovate, invent and inspire each other and take the organisation along with themselves to the next level?

You can accomplish this by applying the acronym CREATE™, which stands for:

C - Culture of trust and collaboration
R - Reward and recognition for creativity is built into the performance monitoring process
E - Environment that provides the appropriate resources, tools and workspaces
A - Actions taken are congruent with the organisation's values and culture
T - Time for creative thinking
E - Energy  in the workplace managed to excite, inspire and motivate everyone

Let's explore these areas in more detail.

C is for Culture of trust and collaboration

Does your organisation foster a culture of trust and collaboration where people are free to express themselves?  Is your team free to disagree with the way things are currently done?  Can each individual propose alternate suggestions without the fear of being ridiculed or ostracised?

I used to work for a firm that said it put trust at the heart of it's culture.  New to the firm I went to a meeting where I was told that it was a forum for open discussion, where we were free to express our opinion, suggest new ideas - that whatever was discussed in the room stays in the room.  "Trust me," said the Director.  The very next day I was called by a member of the senior leadership team berating me for openly expressing my opinion in that meeting - a meeting that they had never even been to.  From that point forward I completely lost all trust in the leadership team and the firm as a whole and became reluctant to express any innovative ideas that would have benefited them.

If you want to encourage and nurture innovation and invention, create an organisational culture that encourages and supports individual expression.

R is for Reward and Recognition

Does your organisation have the appropriate frameworks in place to reward creative minds?  How are people rewarded and recognised for innovation or invention?  Is there a financial framework set up to reimburse inventor and innovators, recognising their skills and promoting further creativity?

When studying my PhD I was in the process of writing my thesis and running out of money to complete it.  The offer from the company that sponsored me at the time was for a small sum of money to help me finish my thesis in return for me handing over all my intellectual property, which I owned, to the company for the sum of £1.  I was broke and felt I had no alternative.  The company was backed by Venture Capitalists and grew off the back of my research and others and unfortunately I received no compensation.  It was a tough pill to swallow and I drifted away from the field as a result of the bitterness I felt after consulting with lawyers on the matter.

To promote creativity, creatives should be promoted, recognised and and rewarded for their achievements. 

E is for an Environment with the appropriate resources, tools and workspaces

Are you in an environment where the appropriate resources, tools and workspaces are available to enable teams to be creative?  Where people can develop new products, techniques and tools and even find new ways of working, or develop new systems?

I consulted for an organisation that had a wonderful core project delivery system and frameworks in place.  With the appropriate delivery frameworks, resources and management systems, we were able to be creative in our approach to solving pretty much anything that we were tasked to.  One Research and Development (R&D) project that I was asked to lead gave me free reign to build the team and find the solution to a critical R&D problem in manufacturing.  Building a team of up to 70 collaborators across the business, we collaboratively resolved a quality control problem in less than six months, which had never previously been fully understood.

If you create the right environment in your organisation, creativity will flourish and innovation will naturally occur.

A is for Action congruent to the organisation's culture and values

Are the actions of your leaders and collaborators congruent with the organisation's culture and values, or is "lip service" being applied, with an oppressive cultural undertone of "do as I say, not as I do"?

I worked for a company that was incredibly focused on wellbeing, yet one day received an email from someone within senior management that seemed to gloat at the fact that other members of senior management had to give up their holiday for a required strategic planning offsite.  From that point forward I questioned the ethics of the company and whether I could really work in a place that didn't uphold its core values.

It's vital for any organisation to role model what it expects in order to build a culture of trust, openness and freedom of expression to allow creativity to flourish.  

T is for Time allocated for creative thinking

Is your organisation creating sufficient time in the week to allow people the needed creative headspace? Are your teams encouraged to dream, strategically think and consider alternate approaches to existing projects or tasks? Or is everyone too busy to even grab a fun lunch, let alone grab that vital free creative thinking time?

It's been proven that by allowing time for creative thinking, ideas can catapult your organisation into a realm where no one else is operating.  Given the pace that technology is now moving, creating this time for people to strategically think and innovate is more important than ever.

E is for Energy in the workplace managed to excite, inspire and motivate everyone

Do you feel excited to go to work?  Is your workplace a fun place to be, where everyone is supportive, motivated and inspired by everyone else?  Or are you counting down the hours before you can go home and recharge before the daily grind starts again?

A fun environment, full of energy and excitement in what everyone is doing, will inspire and motivate others to be creative.  This is fabulously evident in a small innovative organisation I am working for, where everything, despite being a challenge, is fun.  


Be a workplace that everyone wants to go to, not the one they can't wait to leave.

If you enjoyed this article please share.
If you would like advice and support on how to CREATE the right space for invention and innovation to flourish, please email info@htconsultants.com or call +441865600522.
by Ruth Allan 10 Aug, 2017
Have you ever felt let down after organising a meeting where, of all those attendees that accepted or tentatively accepted, only a handful showed up?  Or perhaps been in a discussion where individuals were constantly being distracted on their phone.  Or maybe at home you struggle to get your kids (or other halves) to stop playing games on their latest gadget?!

We are currently in an era where technology can be as much a disabler as an enabler, disrupting our ability to communicate and connect with others effectively and efficiently.  Our email inbox has become a list of everyone else's agendas.  Indeed email is sometimes used as a means of avoiding face to face conversation, or as a way of passing responsibility for a task without even checking the recipient has received or understood the instruction.  Our homes have become surrounded with technology gadgets.  Children are growing up learning how to use devices faster than their parents.  Sometimes it's even difficult to prise our family away from their iPad or iPhone to have a simple conversation!  Taking time away from technology to relax and rejuvenate is becoming more difficult.  In the not too distant future technology or digital detox clinics will start to become the norm.

So what can we do about it?  How can we act as better leaders in the digital age from a holistic perspective, role modelling appropriate behaviour for those that we lead and mentor?  Here are three simple steps to help you do that:

Step 1 - Get in their shoes
Before you send that abrasive email, write that piece of feedback, reply to a meeting invitation that you know you won't attend, or pick up your phone to answer a call when you are in mid conversation, STOP.  Stop and ask yourself - would I be ok with that if I were on the receiving end?  Would I be ok receiving feedback by email rather than face to face?  Would I be ok if someone else interrupted me mid conversation and answered their phone?   How would I feel if someone did that to me?  How would I perceive that person if they did that to me?  Would I treat them with respect?  Sometimes it's so easy to be focused on our own self that we forget to connect with the feelings that we impart on others.  Empathise.  Get connected.  Get in their shoes.

Step 2 - Be present
If you are in a meeting, having a conversation or undertaking a task, be present for the entire time.  Remove any technology distractions that take you away from the present moment.  If you're doing a piece of work on your computer, close down your email to avoid checking it.  If you're having a conversation, put your phone face down, turn it off.  Turn the TV off.  Focus on the task in hand.  Be present with the person you're talking too.  This includes your children, your family and friends.  Time is short - make the moments count.  Be present.

Step 3 - Lead by example
If you call yourself a leader, then lead by example.  Don't become the leader that no one wants to be.  Don't become the leader that no one can rely on, that is always letting others down as they can't manage their inbox or calendar.  Lead by getting in the other persons shoes.  Lead by being fully present.  Lead by connecting with those that you are leading, whether at work or at home.   Prioritise connecting with individuals face to face.  Make time for people.  Create that distinction between work time and family time.  Know when to turn technology off.  Lead by the company values that you represent and most importantly by your own values.  Be congruent with yourself.  Never act in the capacity of do as I say, not as I do.  Be that person that people look up to.   Be the role model.

If you enjoyed this article, please share.

If you feel overwhelmed or saturated by technology, struggling to stay focused and would like to lift your performance and potential to the next level, register for a FREE strategy session to determine how high performance coaching can help you.
by Ruth Allan 04 Aug, 2017
We talk a lot about the importance of looking after our wellbeing - our physical and mental health.  However, in reality, how many of us are actually living by our values - practising what we are preaching, and doing this on a consistent basis?

How often do you find yourself working late or getting up early to meet key deadlines, whether at work or simply managing the family and loved ones?  Are you frequently sacrificing your weekends, missing quality time with those that you care about, finding little time to manage your own mental and physical health?

Here are three simple steps you can take to not only increase your productivity in your day, but also help you relax and recharge.

Step 1:  Own your morning!

Before you open your inbox, or any social media / news app on your phone or computer, or turn the TV on, take time to plan your day.  Yes, pen and paper and write down what you want to achieve for that day.  Think about your goals in life and what your top three priorities are for that day that will move your forward towards those goals.  This should help you remain focused throughout the day and reduce your desire to get distracted by other people's agendas and activities that don't move your forward.

Step 2: Exercise regularly

Everyone says exercise regularly and it really is so important to help you recharge.  You may also find that amazing moments of creativity happen when you get away from your daily activities and have time to reflect.  Schedule your exercise time in your diary, even if this is just a half hour walk.  By putting it in your diary you have a reminder of when you should be doing exercise and to go and DO it!  Block time out in your day to help you recharge.  Why not join a group - even if through a digital health app to help get you motivated with your friends?  Make exercise a must.  Never underestimate the power that exercise can have on your physical and mental wellbeing*.

Step 3: Get some sleep!

It is recommended that you take seven to eight hours of sleep each night.  Less than six hours of sleep per night doubles the risk of heart attack or stroke in at risk people, including those with type two diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.  "I can't sleep that much!" I hear you say, "I've got far too much to do."  Well yes you can.  Make it a must.  Get rid of those non-essential activities that you do during the day that don't move you forward and claw back some time to get to bed earlier.  Reduce or stop watching TV in the evening. Turn off electronic items ideally one hour before bed, or at least 30 minutes before bed to allow you to wind down from the digital noise in the day.  Do this consistently over the next week and you will be surprised at the increase in energy you feel.

*It is recommended that you consult with your doctor if you have any medical conditions to establish an exercise routine that is appropriate for your needs.

If you enjoyed this article please share.

High performance coaching™ helps you achieve heightened and sustained levels of performance and potential in your life, so that you feel more vibrant, energised, purposeful and fulfilled.  If you feel you would benefit from high performance coaching™ to help you achieve these steps on a more consistent basis, contact us to register for a free strategy session!
by Ruth Mary Allan 07 Dec, 2017

Every year we seem to have a habit of setting ourselves New Year’s Resolutions, yet two or three months down the line no action has been taken, we’ve not committed to what we said we would and that gym membership has never been used.   Have you ever done that?!   So what can we do differently to increase our chances of success in achieving what we set out to?   Here’s three simple steps, which we know from high performance studies work, that you can use to help you on your journey to realising your New Year’s resolutions.

Step 1 - Calendarise

How many times have you written something down on a “to do” list, such as a New Year’s resolution and it never gets done?   Did you commit to a date when it would happen by?   To increase your chances of success put your commitments in your calendar.   You are much more likely of success if you do this.   In fact, why not pull out an annual calendar on one page and decide what commitments you are going to do when, so you can visualise it? Get your commitments, in particular when you will start something by or finish something by, in your calendar and set an electronic reminder for yourself!

Step 2 - Communicate

Have you ever made a New Year’s resolution to yourself, but never communicated it to anyone, so you tell yourself “it doesn’t really matter I haven’t done it as no one knows?!”   What would happen if you publicised your New Year’s Resolutions on social media or to your family and friends and asked your network to hold you to account - would that shift your perspective?   By tying your commitment into something bigger than you, such as to your family, friends, workplace, society, you are far more likely to succeed.   So communicate your commitments to others and state what you will do if you don’t achieve it!

Step 3 - Consistency

Underpinning all aspects of high performance living, is consistency.   If your intention as part of your New Year’s resolutions is to set a new habit (such as going to the gym), you need to consistently commit to that new habit.   Ideally for at least 60days for it to really take effect.   To increase your chances of success avoid making a commitment list that’s as long as your arm that you are unlikely to be successful in, e.g. going to the gym five times a week if you’ve never been to it once.   Commit to going once or twice and then increase your frequency.   That’s not to say don’t dream big - absolutely dream big, but take small steps to get there and importantly celebrate the small wins towards those big dreams.

If you enjoyed this post or know of someone that might benefit from it, please like and share!

If you want to register for a discovery session to help you on your journey to not only setting, but achieving those New Year's resolutions, click on the link below!

https://www.ruthmaryallan.com/store/yLMPSunS

by Ruth Allan 22 Nov, 2017
I'm sure we can all cite good and bad examples of leadership in our lives, whether from an experience we've had with those that have led us, or from lessons we've learned ourselves on how to be a better leader.  What factors really stood out for you that differentiated the good leaders from the bad? 

I believe there are ten key attributes that constitute effective leadership, whether in the workplace, at home, or with our wider network.  These can be conveniently remembered by the acronym LEADERSHIP.

L is for Learning from Others

Effective leaders first and foremost are always learning from others. Constantly.  This includes developing the areas that they know they need to work on so that they can stay on their "A" game and better serve others.  Top athletes - leaders in their primary field of interest, are constantly learning new ways to refine their technique, to train more efficiently, to apply the latest technology to improve their performance. 

If as a leader you don't invest time in your own personal development, it's hard to effectively lead and maintain your credibility in your own primary field of interest.

E is for Encouraging Others

Linked to learning, an effective leader is constantly encouraging others with a positive mindset, creating the right environment for individuals and teams to grow.

Have you ever received negative feedback - how did that make you feel?  Rarely does negative feedback help individuals unless they are able to look beyond the negativity and find the lesson within the feedback received.  Effective leaders, however, feed forward and look for ways to help their team be more - whether that's more effective, more efficient, more energised, more motivated.  Effective leaders positively encourage others to become more.

If as a leader you are spending your time berating others, putting people down, you are doing the equivalent of poisoning a flower in your own garden that wants to grow.   Flowers need appropriate watering, nutrients and the right soil to flourish.  Don't be the leader that no one wants to work with.  Set a positive frame of mind, create the positive environment and always seek to encourage others.

A is for Acting with Integrity

Have you ever been in an organisation where they say one thing and do another?  Or they publish the company values yet don't act them out on a consistent basis?  To be an effective leader you need to act with integrity.  Always.  This is not only doing the right thing when no one else is looking, but living by your core values and the values of the company you represent.  With integrity comes trust, so be true to yourself.  Listen to that inner voice of reason and be authentic in how you show up as a leader.

D is being Decisive

Indecisive leaders who constantly seek other people's advice before making any decision very quickly lose credibility.  It's absolutely ok as a leader to ask for advice, but once received, make a decision.  Making no decision is always the wrong decision.  This is because it's a difficult and slow process to learn from indecision.  In contrast, wrong decisions very quickly become apparent, allowing you learn from them and course correct.  Few battles are won from indecision, yet many have been lost.

E is for Engaging with the World Around them

To create a following you need to engage with those that support you and work for you.  You need to engage with your team.  This is not just about organising a social gathering or meeting, but actively listening to what your supporters or team are interested in - what fires them up, what motivates them.  Get to know them at a more personal level.  Get to know the world in which they and you are operating and how it is changing.  If you don't show an interest in those that you are leading, how can you expect them to show an interest in you?  Engage.  Be present.  Be openminded.

R is for Role Model

Linked to acting with integrity, to be an effective leader you have to role model the way.  It is no good saying we "do" this, yet not "doing" that yourself.  Be the role model that everyone looks up to - the person everyone wants to be.

S is for Sharing their Wisdom

Effective leaders don't guard their knowledge - they share it.  Wise people typically share an optimism that life's problems can be solved and exude calm when facing difficult decisions.  Share your wisdom with others so that they too may learn and grow wise.

H is for Honesty

To gain the trust and loyalty of your team, you need to not only act with integrity, but be honest with them and with yourself, particularly in times of difficulty.  Don't be afraid to be vulnerable in the areas you need support on.  If you are prepared to learn from others and act with integrity, being honest should be simply a matter of course.  Leaders that aren't honest very quickly lose the trust of their team and those they are serving.

I is for Inspire

Effective leaders inspire others to think differently, helping others push their own envelop of what they believe is possible by the example that they set.  This in turn helps the organisation that they work for.  Be inspirational.

P is for Passion

Finally to be an effective leader you have to be passionate at what you do.  It's very difficult to lead effectively if you are not passionate about your primary field of interest that you are a leader in.  Linked to inspiring and encouraging others, ignite that fire inside you so that you can light the fire in others.  Be passionate about what you do and who you are leading.

Please leave any comments you have on this article below!  If you enjoyed it please share.

If you would like further support on Effective Leadership, please contact us .
by Ruth Allan 17 Nov, 2017
As we approach that festive time of year, perhaps the first festive present that we receive is a winter virus, a common cold or simply just feeling run down and longing for the festive break.   Have you ever succumbed to the dreaded flu just as you are going into a holiday period, only to loose all your time you wanted to spend relaxing and recharging and spend it in bed?

This used to happen to me frequently.  It was awful as it not only affected me, but also my husband.  There has been many an occasion where he has lost precious holiday time to looking after a sick wife!  Indeed this time last year, run down by the unexpected mental and emotional stress that work and life threw at me, I found myself constantly off sick with a cold or sinusitis, recovering for a short period only to be off sick again.

I didn't want to spend my time constantly nursing a blocked nose, run down and exhausted mentally, physically and emotionally.   I knew that life didn't have to be like that.  It was time to take back control of my wellbeing.

Since taking back control I have not once had a cold or sinusitis.  I've stopped needing to take the drugs that cluttered our medicine cabinet over the festive period.  In addition to that since March 2017 I've lost 26lbs (12kgs) in weight and become the lightest and healthiest I've been in over 10years!

How did I do it?  I became the BOSS™ of my wellbeing:

  • I BELIEVED in myself that I could do it
  • I OVERCAME the hurdles and temptations that decreased my energy levels and performance
  • I SUCCEEDED in achieving my goals of being the fittest I've ever been
  • I soared beyond my own expectations and have begun to inspire and impact other people's lives positively.

So how did I do it?  Here's three simple steps you can take to become the BOSS of your wellbeing and get on that journey to recovery:

Step 1:  Have belief in yourself!

We know from psychology that one of the most important things in achieving success in anything you do is BELIEVING that you can do it.  Visualising not only achieving it, but also the struggles that you will have to go through to get there.  Stop telling yourself that you can't and start believing that you can.  

Write down what you want to believe - what you want to believe you can do and how you want to show up in the world.  Look at that list every day and keep telling yourself you can!  It's time to start believing in you.

Step 2: Overcome your excuses

Do you ever find that you keep making up excuses for yourself as to why you can't do things? e.g.:

  • "I'm not like her/him/them," "I'm not fit enough," "I tried it once before and it didn't work," "I'm not capable," "I'm not good enough," "I don't deserve it," or
  • "I'll start the diet tomorrow," "I'll start my fitness campaign in the New Year"... The list goes on.

Stop making excuses to yourself.  Doesn't your body deserve better than that?  Doesn't your mind deserve to have clarity of thought, your emotions to be under your control?  Stop reaching for that quick fix, such as that chocolate brownie (my nemesis!), that large latte, that alcoholic drink (again other previous favourites of mine) - or whatever it is that you know won't serve your wellbeing over the long term.

Write down all the excuses you keep making to yourself and reframe them to what you will do - you must do along with the benefit it will bring, e.g:

  • "I must switch from having those large full fat caffeinated lattes to small skinny decaf lattes/water as it will allow me to generate a more consistent energy level throughout the day to tackle life's challenges."

Step 3: Success in small steps

Frequently one of the greatest failings in improving our wellbeing consistently over the long term is that we try to take giant leaps at the start of the journey and fail.  Have you ever done that?  The classic "bitting off more than we can chew" and then you give up at the first hurdle because it's too hard?

If you want to improve your wellbeing consistently over the long term you need to play the long term game.  In the same way as we don't see sprinters running marathons, don't try and sprint off the starting blocks when you want to run the whole marathon.  Take small steps.  Tackle one excuse at a time.  Celebrate the small wins - celebrate your successes.  Track your progress and keep focused on the long term goal - never lose sight of it.  Don't give up if you trip up.  Celebrate the fact that you can get up again.  Get up as Mo Farah does and you too can win your race. Stay focused on that dream.

If you enjoyed this article please share.

High performance coaching™ helps you achieve heightened and sustained levels of performance and potential in your life, so that you can feel more vibrant, energised, purposeful and fulfilled.  If you feel you would benefit from high performance coaching™ to help you achieve these steps on a more consistent basis, contact us to register for a free strategy session!
More posts
Share by: